Question: Why Does My Drive Hook Right?

How do I stop hooking the golf ball right?

To fix the issue, turn your hand more towards the target, in a neutral position.

Make sure the V’s between your thumb and index finger on each hand point straight up.

When the V’s are facing more towards your rear shoulder, you are likely to hit a bad left hook..

What causes a pull hook?

Rather than being caused by a lack of rotation in the lower body, a pull hook typically results from lower body rotation that is too fast. When your lower body races out ahead of your upper body – and the club – the result is commonly a wild pull hook.

Why am I hitting down on the ball with my driver?

Most golfers launch the ball either too low, with too much spin, or a combination of both — sapping their game of distance. … The average angle of attack I see with players hitting a driver is 5 degrees down on the ball.

Why can’t I stop slicing my driver?

Again, most slices are caused by an over the top motion on the downswing. When adjusting your setup, make sure to check your grip as well. Most players have a grip that is too weak with thumbs down the handle. Make it stronger by turning your hand to the right when you grip the club.

Does a strong grip cause a hook?

For golfers who struggle with an overdrawing ball flight, we often see a grip that is turned too far away from the target — commonly known as a “strong” grip. This type of grip can often close (and de-loft) the clubface too much in relationship to the swing path and target at impact, leading to the dreaded duck-hook.

Why am I pull hooking my irons?

The upper body obstructs or interferes with the club’s path to the ball. The most common reason players get stuck is, they don’t keep the arms and club in front of the chest as they turn back and through. When the club trails the upper body on the way down, the hands have to flip the clubhead over to recover.

How do I fix my driver going right?

How To Fix Your Slice: 7 Simple Steps To Straight Golf ShotsDon’t Aim Left.Position Your Golf Ball Properly in Your Setup.Take Note of Your Divots.Fix Your Grip.Keep Your Elbow Tucked During Your Backswing.Transfer Your Weight.Release the Club Prior to Impact.

Why are my drives going high and right?

Hitting the ball extra high with the driver is generally a sign of too much backspin. This can often be chalked up to your equipment, other times to your swing, and sometimes traced to a simple flaw in your setup. … Cure: Tee it higher – With the driver, about half the ball should be above the top line of the face.

Why am I hitting the golf ball right?

Ball Position: You might have the ball too far forward in your stance. This causes you to catch the ball when the club is swinging back to the right. Backswing: The club is likely being pushed outside the target line on the way back. The club should track a gentle arc on the way back.

Can standing too close to the golf ball cause a slice?

Standing too far away from the ball can also force the club too far inside the ideal swing plane on the backswing. An under-plane backswing can cause you to lift and deliver the club over the top of the swing plane on the downswing, creating a path that is outside to inside and resulting in the dreaded slice.

Why do I slice my driver but not my irons?

Very simply, with a less lofted club, it’s easier for the ball to curve. … You may even have the same swing with the driver and the iron, however, if you’re hitting down with an iron and up withy the driver (due to ball position), the driver will slice and the irons go straighter (all else being equal).

How do you hold a driver not to slice?

TIP FOR YOUR GRIP: Set your left thumb on the back side of the grip and your right one on top. If you hit a lot of slices, you should “strengthen” your left-hand position on the club. All you have to do is grip it more in the fingers, as opposed to the palm.

What swing path causes a hook?

A hook (ball starts way right of target and curves back too far left) is caused by too much of an in-to-out swing path and too much hand rotation. A pull-hook (ball starts left of target and curves further left) is caused by an out-to-in swing path and too much hand rotation.