Question: Is Grunt A Marine Or Army?

What is the most dangerous job in the military?

So, in no particular order, here are 10 of the most dangerous military jobs.Rifleman.

Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) expert.

Forward observer.

Cavalry scout/Reconnaissance.

Combat medic/Corpsman.

Driver.

Pararescue/Winchman.

Combat engineer.More items…•Mar 20, 2019.

What are Marines called jarheads?

So, during World War II sailors began referring to Marines as Jarheads. Presumably the high collar on the Marine Dress Blues uniform made a Marine’s head look like it was sticking out of the top of a Mason jar. Marines were not insulted. Instead, they embraced the new moniker as a term of utmost respect.

Is a grunt Army or Marine?

A colloquialism for infantrymen in the Army and Marine Corps, grunts are the military’s door kickers and trigger pullers, in short, they’re the pointy end of the spear. By contrast, the term POG — person other than grunt — refers to non-infantry personnel.

Why do Marines say Hoorah?

“As far as I had been told, ‘Oorah simply means ‘let’s kill,'” said Staff Sgt. … Marines and historians have determined the true origins of “Oorah” lie with recon Marines stationed in Korea in 1953.

Is Pog an insult?

Pogue or POG (Person Other than a Grunt) is American pejorative military slang for non-infantry MOS (military occupational specialty) staff, and other rear-echelon or support units.

Why do Marines call Army doggies?

Doggie – Enlisted member of the United States Army, from the World War I era slang “dog-face” for an infantryman.

Is it OK to say oorah to a Marine?

Oorah is a battle cry common in the United States Marine Corps since the mid-20th century. It is comparable to hooah in the US Army and hooyah in the US Navy and US Coast Guard. It is most commonly used to respond to a verbal greeting or as an expression of enthusiasm.

Can a civilian say oorah to a Marine?

Thereof, can civilians say oorah? It is “oorah”, as long as it’s Marine Corps related. Just say it correctly, and if you need an example watch Jamie Foxx say it in the movie Jarhead. The Army gives a “Hoo-uhh” (think Scent of a Woman) and the Navy gives a “Hooyah”.

Are Marines called grunts?

POGs and Grunts – Though every Marine is a trained rifleman, infantry Marines (03XX MOS) lovingly call their non-infantry brothers and sisters POGs (pronounced “pogue,”) which is an acronym that stands for Personnel Other than Grunts. POGs call infantrymen Grunts, of course.

What are grunts in the military?

The meaning of POG, in military talk, is Person Other than Grunt, while a “grunt” is a term to define infantrymen and combat arms soldiers whose AIT, which stands for Advanced Individual Training, is in the Infantry School. Their Military Occupational Specialty or MOS puts them on the frontline.

Where does the term grunt come from?

Some say the term started in Vietnam when POGs needed their own term to describe the dirty, smelly infantrymen who made fun of the troops who sat in air-conditioned buildings all day instead of getting stuck in the jungle.

Is grunt a derogatory term?

Evidently, according to my big book of military derogatory term origins, the term “grunt” started in Vietnam with its first appearance in print in 1969 as an acronym to describe the guys who ended up on the front lines. … As you might expect, used by Navy personnel frequently in reference to ground based forces.

What does Granny Grunt mean?

Over the years, I’ve met so many elderly people like ‘Granny Grunt’; people who, not wanting to be ‘a burden’ to their families, tell them not to visit, some going so far as to invent a non-existent social life.

What do Marines say in response to Semper Fi?

OorahYet, if it’s said to you, saying Semper Fi in response would suffice as a sign of respect. Another common response to Semper Fi is the Marine chant – “Oorah!” which is not to be confused with the “hooah!” of the Army or “hooyah!” of the Navy and Coast Guard.

What does grunt stand for?

Ground Replacement UntrainedGRUNTAcronymDefinitionGRUNTGround Replacement Untrained (stamped on assignment dispatches)